Tag: Study Abroad

“How I somehow got accepted to do a Master at Waseda University in Japan…”

As promised, following on from Charlotte’s post about life and work since graduating last month, another of our 2017 graduates, Julie Perruchon who just completed her BA Hons in French and English, has sent us an article about her plans for the next couple of years which will see her embarking on postgraduate studies in Japan:

“Like any other student, my final semester at the University of Stirling consisted mostly of essay writing, university applications and general agonizing about the future. I had decided that I was determined to go to Japan; either to do a Master, or as an English teacher at an ‘Eikawa’ (English Language Schools). I had done a lot of research, looking into the universities that offered Master courses in English, as my Japanese abilities only extend to surviving day–to-day life. To my mum’s chagrin, I stubbornly only applied to Universities and jobs in Japan. She might have been right in saying that it would have been sensible to apply to university in either Denmark or Scotland as well, but I happily ignored all common sense and threw myself into my preparations.

I can’t count the times I went to my tutors to ask them to write references for me (which I can’t thank them for enough), how many books I read about Japanese society and culture for my research plan, and how many excruciating hours I spent filling out an endless stack of forms. After being rejected three times (by the JET-Programme, ICU and the GABA Corporation), I got accepted to Waseda University’s Graduate School of International Culture and Communication Studies, where I will be studying under the study plan of Culture and Communication. To my (and my mother’s) huge relief! My directed research supervisor hails from a British University (and is in possession of a decidedly British name), so a little piece of the Isles will be waiting for me in the Far East. On the basis of my research plan, it has already been decided that I will write my Master thesis on the topic of ‘The Intellectual and Literary History of Japan’, focusing on how different societal traditional systems have affected the lives of Japanese youths living in urban areas. Quite a mouthful, and I cannot wait to get started.

Japan being seven hours ahead of Denmark, I could go online and check whether I had been accepted to Waseda quite early in the morning. I was almost certain that my application had been rejected, so it came as a huge surprise when I saw the tiny numbers on my laptop screen that represented my application number. And, as one does, I couldn’t sleep for excitement for the rest of the night and started planning my future venture in great detail (or as great detail as a sleep deprived brain can muster).

And then reality hit. I don’t know if anyone reading this has ever been to Japan, or lived there, but finding an apartment without a Japanese bank account or phone number is proving to be rather difficult (read: almost impossible). Thankfully, I have the invaluable help of Waseda’s International Office, and I’m sure (fingers crossed) that I’ll be able to find my own tiny 12 square feet apartment squashed away in some corner of Tokyo. In the situations where befuddling paperwork and the promise of earthquakes have me questioning my own sanity, I look back fondly on how easy it was to move between Scotland and Denmark. No visa, no Certificate of Eligibility, no huge language barriers, no earthquakes (yes, I am terrified), and only one hour’s time difference to my native country. Pure heaven.

2017 Julie Perruchon Japan Pic July17My hope is that two years in Japan will help me master the Japanese language, and bring me new challenges both in my personal and University life. Now that it’s sure that I am going over there, it seems quite surreal and I haven’t yet completely wrapped my head around the fact that in less than a month and a half, I will be walking beneath the neon lights of the Shinjuku district in Tokyo. It’s the complete opposite from small and idyllic Stirling, with the most beautiful campus in the world, and nature just around the corner. Japan, and Tokyo, is going to be the next big adventure, and I can’t wait to see where what this decision is going to bring me. It’s terrifying and exciting, and I am overjoyed that I got the chance to go there.

So really, all there is left to say is a huge thank-you to the University of Stirling and everyone there! Mille mercis.”

Many thanks to Julie for taking the time to write this blog post and we’re looking forward to tales of life (and language learning) in Japan over the next few years! Best wishes for the course!

Studying Languages: ‘Seizing every opportunity offered by the world’

As well as running a wide range of degree programmes combining French with one other subject, we also run three programmes in International Management, all of which have a core language component (French and/or Spanish) alongside Management and one other subject area, depending on the specific pathway. These degrees enable students to develop high-level skills across three disciplines and all include integral periods of Study Abroad. Our latest student profile comes from Matteo, who has just completed the first year of one of these degree programmes:

2017 Matteo de Simone picture July“Hello, my name is Matteo De Simone and I am studying International Management with European Languages and Society at the University of Stirling. I come from Taranto, a Southern Italian city located in Puglia; the heel of the boot of Italy. There I attended liceo classico, the Italian equivalent of High School. I studied a wide range of different subjects, but we mainly focused on Latin, Ancient Greek and Italian literature. Once I earned my diploma, I realised that I wanted to broaden my mind by learning new languages, travelling, meeting people from different cultural backgrounds and experiencing the world first-hand. This was, and is, my fuel; and steers me towards the field of Economics as well as towards learning other languages. This is why I decided to attend a school for interpreters and translators; speaking other languages means seeing life from different perspectives, a skill that helps aid better understanding of culture-specific decisions and issues, both economic and social. Moreover, I had the opportunity to improve my use of English and also begin to study French, a language I completely fell in love with; the sound of its words, the concise and straightforward grammar, and its reputation as the language of diplomacy are just some of the reasons I wanted to expand on my studies.

After working as an English/Italian interpreter for Boeing, I was looking for a new challenge, and heard about the University of Stirling. I found a course which was tailored to my needs and my wants; one which combines management theories and languages and would allow me a better understanding of different cultural and economic systems. I decided to take the plunge and apply, and here I am!

My French tutor is very passionate about teaching and tries to instil such passion in every student. This creates an ideal learning environment; in every French seminar, each student has the opportunity to practice their grammar by speaking, reading and carrying out exercises to improve their use of language, as well as broadening their knowledge of French culture.

This is what I look forward to – improving my knowledge of French grammar, as well as broadening my mind and understanding our world through different cultures, mind sets and opinions; reaping the full benefits from different experiences by seizing every opportunity offered by the world.”

Many thanks to Matteo for taking the time to write this article and we wish him all the best for the years ahead.

French and English at Stirling: ‘I’m so excited for next year!’

2017 Paige Hepburn Student Profile PicWhat better way to start the new week than with another student profile? Paige Hepburn has just finished the first year of her BA Hons in French and English and has sent us this post with her thoughts on the past year and the semesters ahead:

“My name is Paige Hepburn and I have just finished my first year at Stirling University. I had my heart set on Stirling since high school because of the option to do a combined degree. I want to become a high school English teacher so the idea of doing Education alongside my English degree really appealed to me.

In first and second year at Stirling University you have the opportunity to choose three subjects, which is the perfect chance to explore your options and pursue your interests. I chose French as my optional module because I thoroughly enjoyed studying it at school and because of my personal ambitions to be fluent in French, but I had never thought about doing a French degree.

I chose the Beginners’ module because I had been out of education for a few years before attending University and was worried I’d forgotten everything. I’m so glad I did! The Beginners’ modules are designed to bring a complete beginner up to the appropriate level. For me, the course was a fast-paced refresher and consolidation of everything I had learned so far. My seminar tutor, Brigitte Depret, was fantastic. She was so enthusiastic and really brought the French to life, and the fact that she was a Native French speaker was a bonus!

By the end of my first year I realised I had enjoyed French so much that couldn’t imagine not studying it in the future so I changed my degree to a Bachelor of Arts with Honours in French and English Studies. French has opened my eyes to the option of teaching English as a foreign language, in France of course! At the end of next year, I will have the opportunity to spend a year in France, working as an English Language Assistant through the British Council which, as a future teacher, would provide invaluable classroom experience as well as the perfect setting to immerse myself in the French language. Studying French at Stirling also gives you the opportunity to study abroad in France or a French-speaking country as part of your course. I can’t wait to embrace these opportunities. I’m so excited for next year!”

Many thanks to Paige for sending this post and we’re looking forward to seeing where the next few years will take you, both in terms of time abroad and on the modules that lie ahead!

Fantastic Schools Event at Stirling

Over the past two days, French at Stirling has been playing host to around 200 school pupils and their teachers from across the Central Belt (and beyond). It’s been a packed couple of days with pupils who are just starting their French Highers and Advanced Highers getting a chance to find out what studying a language at University is like.

The days started with a mini-lecture on contemporary French society before the pupils were split into smaller seminar groups for a written language class in the morning. After lunch, it was back into smaller groups for a culture class focusing on extracts from a series of auto-portraits written by school pupils from Clichy-sous-Bois. The final session of the day brought all the pupils back together again for a series of presentations from a group of this year’s finalists, all talking about the benefits of Study Abroad and time abroad more generally, and then an employability-focused talk from our Employability and Skills Officer and a group of graduates from the past few years, talking about where French has taken them.

2017 Schools Event Bearsden Academy Pupils June17
Bearsden Academy pupils

 

And while the pupils were busy with seminars and learning about study abroad and the employability benefits of studying a language, their teachers were whisked off for two CPD sessions led by Stirling academics. The first, led by Elizabeth Ezra, focused on approaches to teaching film and the afternoon session, led by Fiona Barclay, centred on assessment and feedback of culture-based essays in the language classroom.

We’d like to say thank you to everyone who came along – to the teachers for taking the time to do this and to all the pupils for participating so well over the course of the days. Thanks also go to Stirling staff who have been involved, as well as to PhD student Fanny Lacôte for giving up her time to help us, and to all the finalists and graduates who gave up their afternoons to come and tell the pupils about their experiences.

Feedback from our visitors and from French at Stirling staff has been extremely positive with pupils commenting about how much they enjoyed seeing what studying French at University is like and that they particularly appreciated hearing from our finalists and graduates, and we look forward to organising future schools events in the future. In the meantime, if you’re reading this and want a chance to find out more about studying with us, we have a recruitment Open Day this Saturday (17 June) and would be delighted to get a chance to tell you more there!

French at Stirling Stevenson Successes

2017 Stevenson winners in Strasbourg Stefano Nicolas AnnikaFélicitations to Annika, Nicolas and Stefano – three French at Stirling students who have just finished their 2nd year and who have each been awarded a Stevenson Exchange Scholarship to help them undertake a project of research during their Semester Abroad next Spring. This is a great achievement for all three and we’ll post updates on their progress while they’re away on Study Abroad but we wanted to share their success.

The Stevenson Exchange Scholarships are awarded competitively each year with applicants from across all the Scottish Universities who have to submit an application including a research project outline and then attend an interview at Glasgow University. The range of topics Annika, Nicolas and Stefano will be exploring thanks to their scholarships gives a really good sense of the variety of research interests across undergraduate Languages students.

Annika is interested in the development of French social structures with particular focus on the relationship with the EU and the scholarship will help her, among other things, travel to Marseille to visit the Musée des Civilisations de l’Europe et de la Méditerranée and to Roubaix to spend time researching in the Archives nationales du monde du travail.

Nicolas’s project aims to build on time he has already spent working in the fashion industry near Milan in order to further pursue his interest in fashion and the development of the fashion industry in France. As well as attending events around Paris Fashion Week, he intends to visit the Musée de la Mode in Albi and the Musée de Tissus et des Arts Décoratifs in Lyon.

As for Stefano, he wants to use the scholarship to enhance his knowledge of Human Rights, with a particular focus on those of refugees in France. The key components of his research project include planned trips to Mechel (Belgium) and to Geneva (Switzerland), to visit, respectively, the Kazerne Dossin–Mémorial, Musée et Centre de Documentation sur l’Holocauste et les Droits de l’Homme and the Musée International de la Croix-Rouge et du Croissant-Rouge.

This year’s trio will be following previous Stirling Stevenson successes, including Jeanne who is currently in Granada for her Semester Abroad, having been awarded a Scholarship through Spanish at Stirling. Having already undertaken a good deal of research into the question of the teaching of ‘untold’ histories through discussions with teachers at school and University-level about their experiences teaching on aspects of Franco’s Spain, Jeanne is now planning to focus to expand her research to include visits to historical monuments. “I will visit the Centro Federico García Lorca, where there is a library, to see if the War and the dictatorship are depicted and if so, how. I will also visit the rest of the Provincial Prison of Granada, almost fully destroyed, and the Campana prison for political opponents during Francoism, and the Cartel de las Palmas (where torture used to be carried out). She’s also planning a trip to Madrid, to see Guernica, and to Toledo, to visit the Museum of War.

Félicitations once again, to both the new Stevenson Scholars and those currently completing their projects from this past year!

“Studying at Stirling makes me feel like I have come long way”: Erasmus exchange in Stirling

Every year, we get the chance to welcome to Stirling students from our numerous Eramus and other exchange partners across France and the wider Francophone world, either for one semester or for a full academic year, and I’m really pleased to be able to post this article by Quentin Rataud who is here for a Spring semester Erasmus exchange from our partner in Limoges.

2017 Quentin pic March“In 2015 I graduated from the Faculty of Arts and Letters of the University of Limoges in France with a Bachelor of Arts in English Studies. I studied British and North-American civilisation and literature, as well as arts analysis, linguistics, and translation. I have been passionate about English since high school and ever since I have always been eager to learn more about the English-speaking world. After graduating, I decided to take my language studies further and applied to do a Master’s Degree in English Studies at Limoges.

Studying foreign cultures and a foreign language is marvellous, but I felt like something was missing in my university training. I felt the need to study abroad, so I applied to the Erasmus exchange programme to study in the United Kingdom. My home university offered me the opportunity to study at the University of Stirling. I had never been to Scotland before and to me it is the best way to meet the people and the wonders of this great nation.

I have chosen to study linguistics and translation here at Stirling to try to improve my English, besides practicing it every day. It turned out that I was right to do so! Things are different compared to what I was used to in France. There, I was taught about theory so now I have all the tools to improve and study in a more pragmatic way.

More than 2 months have already passed since I arrived in Scotland and I must admit that time flies. I have met many great people here, everything is different from home. I have the chance to live on campus, and I really enjoy it. Studying abroad provides you so many opportunities, it has considerably changed my everyday life and I feel happier about it.

The University of Stirling offers several programmes and services to help students, inter alia the Careers and Employability Service, which is helpful for students who do not exactly know what they would like to do after graduating. Also, the teaching staff is admirably available and never hesitates to help students, providing them information and suggestions for their future careers. I wish more universities would follow their example.

I am honestly glad to be here in Scotland. It makes me feel like I have come such a long way. As most students concerned about the future, studying abroad helped me to find my way. I cannot thank sufficiently all the people who allowed me to study at Stirling.”

Many thanks to Quentin for this article and for the very kind words about Stirling – we’re delighted you’ve enjoyed your semester here and hope you’ll keep in touch once you go back to France. And, who knows, maybe one day a PhD in Stirling will beckon…

“French is a global language”: from whisky tasting in Belgium to language teaching in Portugal

And, following on from Beth Young’s article, tales from another of our graduates, John McCallum who completed his BA Hons in International Politics and Languages in 2012 and whose language skills have seen him crisscrossing Europe for work ever since.

“My first role after graduating from the University of Stirling in 2012 in French and International Politics was as a sales and marketing executive with a whisky distillery, Springbank, in my hometown of Campbeltown, Argyll. During that year I had the chance to travel in Europe and work several times in francophone Belgium, visiting French-speaking stockists and taking whisky tastings in French. It was a great experience to be able to talk about your town and a local industry to people in their own mother tongue.

Using French in a professional situation can be different than just practising socially, especially when there is industry-specific vocabulary to learn to help you do the job better, and more time pressure on you to deliver it. On completing my studies I felt at a really strong level, though, and that is testament to the range of material we studied and the opportunity for conversation on various topics while in a classroom setting at Stirling.

Another reason for having the confidence to speak in the language was having spent a semester abroad in Paris, an unforgettable experience. As well as having the opportunity to attend Sciences Po, the popular pathway for some of France’s past and present political elites, I joined a football club and spent my Sunday afternoons in various banlieue towns in the Val de Marne area, learning a different style of football and what can only be described as ‘français des vestiaires’ on a thrice-weekly basis. I would echo another 2012 graduate Jonny Terrell’s post in saying I wish it could’ve been for the whole year!

But at Stirling too I always felt that my degree drew on great expertise in both languages and politics departments. I consistently had the support I needed and met lots of great people when studying there, from not only Scotland but from an international background.

After time spent working in newspaper reporting in Argyll, the odd weekend stint as a purser on a passenger RIB from Campbeltown to Ireland, and working with another distillery on the isle of Islay for a year under a French parent company, I have had lots of opportunities to use my language skills, both in the workplace and when simply wanting to make conversation and practise everyday French.

For the past six months I have been working as an English-language teacher in Braga, in the north of Portugal. I am working on improving my Portuguese, and although it is a complex language itself with tough grammar and pronunciation, I would like to try becoming a lusophone too, even when back living in Scotland. However, French is a popular lingua franca here given the immense movement of people and familial links established between the countries during the past 60 years and has saved me a few times when the other person in the conversation hasn’t had a word of English!

It shows that learning a global language like French can have practical uses much more diverse than you originally imagined. I would thoroughly recommend Stirling as a place to learn the language.”

Many thanks – obrigado! – to John for sending this article and we look forward to finding out where your languages will take you next!