Tag: Opportunities

Unlocking future chapters

And, as promised, following Artie’s blog post, it’s over to Julian who graduated a few years ago in French and Law and whose career so far has involved a good deal of travel which gives us a great excuse to include some pictures…:

2020 Apr Julian San Diego‘When I moved to Germany, almost four years ago I didn’t really have a plan. After years of moving countries (from Scotland, to studying abroad in Vancouver and Paris), coming “home” felt necessary, provided, I didn’t know what would follow. All I knew was what I had to offer, I had the keys, I just had to find the right door.

I used to take growing up trilingual for granted and it wasn’t until I came to Stirling to study French, that I really began to fathom the true power of language. That in this cosmopolitan world, the power to understand and be understood is the greatest currency that counts. And by the end of my studies in Stirling, I felt by all means wealthy.

2020 Apr Julian Great Wall of China

When the time came to pick a career, like many graduates, I was overwhelmed. I felt myself stumped by the idea of finding a job that not only fulfilled me, but where I could also hone the language skill-set acquired from my Stirling degree. In Munich, after much pondering, I found the perfect path at the time: I became a flight attendant.

2020 Apr Julian Cape TownAfter studying, this has been the most rewarding decision I’ve made. I’ve spent three years now jet setting around the globe, seeing and exploring the world in a way that would have never been possible without my language skills acquired during my time at Stirling. And although I am beginning to feel that it is time to diversify and seek a career change, these past three years have felt like hitting the jackpot because I was able to unlock life experiences I never could have imagined.

I started writing this post just before it became evident what dimensions the Covid-19 outbreak would take and the effect this might have on our lives, health and possibly even careers. My time in the skies could be coming to a quicker end than I ever wished or expected. Like many, I am now confined to my flat, hoping that we somehow overcome this pandemic. I wish everyone from the French department, past and present, all the best and good health in these unsettling times. I am sure that our studies at Stirling will keep unlocking future chapters in our lives!’

Many, many thanks to Julian for this great update – we really hope that everything falls into place swiftly and positively and, in the meantime, stay well and stay safe!

A journey into the wonders of French

Two blog posts for the price of one today! Both the authors – Artie first, then Julian – are very much caught up in the current Covid-context so there are some thoughts here on the immediate impacts that is having on the lives of recent(-ish) Languages graduates. However, both have also been kind enough to reflect on their lives and career paths since graduation, with plenty of food for thought for anyone reading this and wondering where a degree involving a language might lead them… First, it’s Artie’s turn:

‘My journey into the wonders (and confusions at the many same-sound endings) of French language learning began with my studies at the University of Stirling in September 2012 with a degree in French and Spanish. I began the degree with a beginner’s knowledge of French (and by beginner’s, I mean absolutely zero French know-how, I still remember learning the phrase “Je suis de Doncaster” in one of my first classes…).

By graduation in 2016 I had vastly improved my knowledge of both French language and culture, with some of my French writing assessments equalling, and even surpassing my Spanish writing. I graduated with a First-Class honour’s degree and this became the foundation which I have since used to explore multiple career avenues.

Through the University of Stirling, I was able to complete a year as an English Language Assistant with the British Council in Tenerife upon graduating. I had two potential career paths I was interested in following, teaching or translation, and this allowed me the opportunity to trial run one. My professors at the University of Stirling also helped me apply for a scholarship to fund a research project while working with the British Council, an opportunity I surely wouldn’t have had otherwise. While I enjoyed my time immensely as an English Language Assistant and was offered to stay a further year, I ultimately decided to return to academia, and began a Masters in Translation Studies at the University of Glasgow.

I continued with my original language pair, French and Spanish, while attending advanced translation and translation theory classes. Here, I was able to build on practices already learned in my Undergraduate course adding further translation theory, fully confident, not only in my ability to state where I’m from, but also pay attention to nuances within the French language, differences between French and English writing styles, becoming ever more confident in my own writing abilities and stylistic choices as a translator.

After completing my Master’s in Translation Studies at the University of Glasgow, I started work as a Videogames Localisation Quality Assurance Tester, a really rather long title for what I actually did – play video games and make sure translations are error free and feel made for the target audience. It has been an excellent graduate role where I mainly work with likeminded people of a similar age group, in a fairly relaxed multicultural office environment with plenty of opportunities to practice my speaking skills (not that I ever feel like I do this enough). After beginning work as a Tester, I then combined my testing experience with my background in teaching and began training any new starts that came into the company. Following on from this, I moved onto Project Coordinating where I began coordinating the testers, as opposed to directly testing the videogames myself. Through this role, I further developed managerial, timekeeping, organisational and communication skills – all of which are highly coveted in the world of translation where Project Coordinators are always needed.

And so, we have arrived my present situation! I, like most everyone else, am currently at home, self-isolating, faced with the current global circumstances but, oddly enough, it is a time when we are all most connected, checking in with each other, doing those little things that have been neglected on our to-do list (like… say… writing an article for a blog) and where language skills are just as important as ever. Most recently I had the opportunity to translate a UN document from French into English as a volunteer while staying at home, interview for a potential role in Bordeaux, and I’m using this time to attempt to build up a freelance client base in the hopes of maybe, hopefully (fingers and toes crossed!) being able to translate as a Freelancer by the end of the year. And let’s not forget the most taxing at home activity of all – watching an abundance of French films and series as a vital means of continuing my exposure to the language, it’s a hard job but someone has to do it!

I do hope everyone is keeping safe in these tricky times and remember enjoy your time at the University of Stirling while you can, it’ll be over before you know it!’

Many, many thanks to Artie for taking the time to send us this fantastic blog post – I, for one, have learned things about the role of translation in gaming that I certainly didn’t know before! We hope all goes well with the client-base-building and we look forward to more updates in the future. In the meantime, stay well and stay safe.

From a Paris living room to the ‘anywhere box’

As lockdown measures and confinement and a range of different restrictions continue to be implemented across the globe, it’s particularly welcome to receive news and updates from former students (current students are also very welcome to get in touch!) who find themselves dotted across the world. Like everyone else, they are adapting to the current circumstances and thinking about the impact on their plans (professional and personal) and we’re very grateful to them for sharing their thoughts with us and for finding the time to send through new blog posts.

2020 Apr David V Pic IIIToday, it’s the turn of David, whose travels in Colombia and Sicily regular readers will have followed over the past couple of years, and who has sent the article below with some photos of an empty but sunny day in the Parisian suburbs:

‘If you had asked me where I would be, at this point in time, seven months ago after my last blog update, my living room in Paris would definitely not have been at the top of my list! Before I tell you how I ended up here, however, I thought I could perhaps tell you about the joys of teaching!

As mentioned in my previous piece, I decided that I was finally ready to start my teaching qualification after a couple of years of experience. My course at the University of Glasgow consists of teaching theory as well as teaching practice as a language teacher. My first placement was in a school in Paisley where I saw first-hand how much work teachers have to deal with on a daily basis. As one of my colleagues said, you aren’t only teaching them a language, but also teaching them how to learn it. I hadn’t realised how much planning was involved in order to stay on top of the workload. Some teachers’ capacity to juggle classes made up of pupils with completely different levels is mind-blowing!

My second placement was in a school in Clydebank where I learnt to become more independent as a teacher and create my own resources for my lessons. Located to the west of Glasgow, an area that includes some of the most deprived parts of Scotland where many pupils live in very challenging conditions. However, the school showed me how being part of a community of teachers and parents could create more opportunities for underprivileged pupils by working together. Overall, the course at Glasgow has been challenging but ultimately rewarding as I have learnt to adapt to difficult situations inside, and outside, the classroom.

Looking back at my undergrad years, I am grateful for the flexibility of the courses offered at the University of Stirling as well as the range of topics that we had the opportunity to study, from French Canadian cinema to Latin American literature. The exchange programme was also one of the reasons I decided to travel and work abroad… How time flies!

Now, to come back to my living room in Paris, it turns out that, due to the unprecedented measures taken by the Scottish government, both face-to-face classes and my third and final placement have been cancelled. This means I will go straight into teaching as a probationer in August! I have opted for the lucky dip option by ticking the “anywhere box” to quote the General Teaching Council, so will be sent wherever I am needed in Scotland. As a result of the pandemic, I decided to return home since I wanted to be with family over Easter.

2020 Apr David V Pic IIThere were only about 30 people on the plane as most people had cancelled their trips and the French government announced yesterday that there would be a further two weeks of “confinement” during which we are only allowed to leave our homes for an hour a day in order to buy essentials such as food and medicine or for daily light exercise within a 1 km radius. It is quite an odd experience having to fill out a form before leaving the house as the police may stop people to check that they are sticking to the rules but then desperate times call for desperate measures! It seems that the U.K. is not at that stage yet. However, having been in touch (not literally of course!) with friends from Sicily and Colombia, everyone is following WHO guidelines and staying at home to avoid any risk of transmission.

So that’s it for now and remember: lavez-vous les mains!’

Many, many thanks to David for sending this update – good luck with the remainder of the course and we look forward to finding out where the GTC send you next year! Keep in touch and stay safe.

‘You might get knocked back a few times but your time will come!’

We’re on something of a roll at the moment with posts from former French at Stirling students, allowing us to paint a great picture of the variety of routes degrees involving languages can take you down, from financial crime analysis to tour-guiding and TEFL, from British Council Language Assistantships to the emergency services, via some thoughts on how to find ways to keep your language/s going after graduation… Today’s post takes in translation, postgraduate studies, proofreading, subtitling and teaching, courtesy of Stewart who graduated with a BA Hons in French and Spanish in 2015:

‘It’s been over 3 years since I graduated from Stirling now. A lot has changed in my life in that time. Some for the better, some for the worse. When I left Stirling, I had grand plans about what I could do with my degree and the places it could take me but life has a habit of getting in the way and putting unexpected obstacles in front of you.

When I last wrote for the French At Stirling blog, I had just got a Master’s in Translation from Heriot-Watt University. I was maybe naïve but I thought it would be relatively easy to get a job but for whatever reason it didn’t work out that way. It can be tough when you keep getting knocked back to stay positive especially in the age of social media when you can receive almost daily updates on how well friends and former classmates are doing for themselves. I was never the most optimistic guy at the best of times!

As time wore on, I eventually found success. Out of desperation I had applied for two translation jobs at the same time and got interviews for both. One based in Scotland, one based in Spain. I nailed both interviews too. The Spanish one was done over Skype and conducted in 3 languages. I was quite proud to come through that in one piece. I was eventually offered both jobs. Decision time! Guess which one I took…

2020 Mar Stewart H Bute Palm Trees
Bute Palm Trees

Scotland won the day. If you read my last blog you probably understand why. Although I study languages and like to travel, I’m very much a fan of home comforts. I come from an island which a lot of people my age refer to as “The Rock”. It has a declining and ageing population. Most young people leave when they go to university or to find a job on the mainland and don’t return. There are still times when I can’t wait to leave yet when I am away, I can’t wait to come back. It must be an islander thing!

Anyway, I was now working as an in-house translator. I gained experience translating medical and legal documents and met some new people but after some time, I started to realise it just wasn’t for me. I found myself staring at a computer screen all day and was living on my own. Life’s too short to be stuck doing something you don’t enjoy.

2020 Mar Stewart H Do sth different

After I left that job, I moved back home to mull over my next move. It was April 2018 and the FIFA World Cup was just around the corner. I’ve always been a massive football fan and I got the opportunity to combine two passions of mine in football and languages. I worked as a remote translator, proofreader and subtitler. I was able to watch all the games and then translate interviews with players and coaches all from the comfort of my own home. This was the dream but there are only so many World Cups! I liked the flexibility of being freelance and being back home, but I also found myself wanting to get out more and meet new people.

After a few months, I decided to apply for a PGDE in Secondary Education at the University of Glasgow. I was going to become a teacher. It wasn’t a spur of the moment decision. My dad had been a Geography teacher years ago and I was struck by how many of his former pupils had got in touch when he passed away showing just how big an impact he’d had on their lives. I’ve also always felt at home when studying for some reason. It gave me a purpose knowing I had some test or exam to pass or a deadline to make. I feel in retrospect I missed that drive when I left university.

The course at Glasgow gave me a good grounding in what it takes to become a teacher. I did 3 placements throughout the year giving me a taster of what to expect when in front of the class but nothing can truly prepare you! Luckily my decision to choose Argyll & Bute paid off and I am now teaching French and Spanish in the same school where I first learned languages as a pupil all those years ago. It has been a steep learning curve and there is never a dull day, but I wouldn’t change it for anything. Will I still be teaching in 5, 10, 30 years’ time? Who knows! Life has a habit of getting in the way, but I will give it my best shot while I am still doing it.

I know I wouldn’t be in this position were it not for my time at Stirling. I still keep in touch and meet up with some of my old classmates who are all doing different and exciting things with their own lives. I would advise any current students or recent graduates who are looking to make that next step and find a job to stay patient. You might get knocked back a few times but your time will come!’

Many thanks indeed to Stewart for sending through this great update! We’re really pleased to hear that things are going well with the language teaching and look forward to future blog posts.

From Stirling to Soissons: History, Travel and Bell Chimes

After Emily’s account of working as an Emergency Services Officer in the Australian desert, it’s back to Europe again with an update from Alex who graduated with a BA Hons in French and Maths last June:

‘Just even writing this, I cannot believe that it has already been eight months since I graduated from the University of Stirling. As much as I am missing seeing the Ochils and Wallace Monument every day, the last six months have been awesome. I am just over halfway through my British Council placement in France for the academic year 2019/20 and it has been fantastic. I was allocated to the Académie d’Amiens and more specifically, two high schools in the town of Soissons in the north-east of France.

2020 Mar Alex Soissons CathedralAlthough Soissons has a small population of 30,000, about two-thirds of the size of Stirling, there is just as much history to be found in this part of France. Under the reign of King Clovis I in the late 4th and early 5th Centuries, Soissons was under the rule of the Franks, after the Battle of Soissons in 486 AD. And when Clovis died in 511, it became the capital of what we know today as north-east France. All of this history can be discovered in the Musée de Soissons, which is just 2€ entry (bar the first Sunday of every month when it is free!). There are two abbeys and a cathedral all within walking distance of the centre of town. I live a two-minute walk away from the cathedral, in fact I can see it from my kitchen window! You never get tired of hearing the bell chimes every 15 minutes (from 8am to 10pm) and looking at this amazing piece of architecture.

I feel incredibly lucky with the allocation of my schools. One school is a 15-minute walk from my accommodation, whilst the other is just a 20-minute bus ride from the centre of town, and the buses are less than 1€ per ride. I work with four different teachers and they are all fantastic. Personally, I think it’s beneficial to see different styles of teaching and approaches to assessments and language learning. Sometimes I work in groups of between 4 and 8 students outside of the main class, or I will stay with the main teacher and we’ll work on an activity together. I have even had the opportunity of teaching full classes myself, particularly with presentations on Anglophone culture or certain points of grammar.

In both of my schools with the 14-15 year-old students (3èmes), we have been doing débats citoyens every week, debating a wide range of topics such as:

  • “Footballers deserve to earn the salary they receive”
  • “Capital punishment should be reinstated for the most serious of crimes”
  • “TV reality shows teach us about life”
  • “Art is necessary for the development of man”
  • “Teachers in the USA should be allowed to carry firearms in the event of a mass shooting”

This is a great way for the older students to become more confident and spontaneous at speaking in English. It also provides them additional cultural exposure to the Anglophone world that they might not see in class.

On top of my British Council contract, I managed to gain an hour a week through the Soissons Town Hall of doing English activities with primary school students in an after-school club. Although I prefer working with 11-16 year-olds, this has been a great opportunity for me to work with children between 8 and 11 years old, and discover the level of English children have before attending high school.

2020 Mar Alex Soissons AssistantsI have been very lucky in where I live too! I was offered accommodation by one of my teachers in a boarding school in the centre of Soissons. Turns out that I live with 6 other assistants, with all of us coming from different parts of the world; England, Northern Ireland, Spain, Mexico, the USA, and the Bahamas! We get on really well and they are a huge part of the reason why this experience has been so good. Having other people there with you every single day makes it so much easier, so I would suggest (if possible) new assistants try to live with other young people to make you feel more comfortable in your new surroundings.

And since I only work 13 hours a week (British Council – 12 hours, Soissons Town Hall – 1 hour), I have had a lot of time to travel. In fact, each académie in France will encourage you to “profitez de vos week-ends et voyagez!” Since October, I have so far been to (in France) Paris, Lyon, Strasbourg, Rennes, Amiens, Reims, Rouen and Saint Malo, and I will heading further south during the warmer months! I have also journeyed outside of France to both Belgium, to the cities of Brussels and Ghent, and the Netherlands, visiting Rotterdam. Therefore, I would advise the same to anyone thinking of doing an assistantship: take advantage of your weekends and 2-week half-term breaks and travel across France and the rest of Europe! I would recommend buying either a SNCF Carte Jeune or a Carte Régionale (for each Département in France), which gets you 30% and 50% off rail fares respectively. Flixbus is also an absolute gem if you’re looking to travel cheaply!

2020 Mar Alex Strasbourg

So, where does this leave me after this experience? I have decided after this experience that I would like to become a secondary school teacher and am in the process of applying for my teaching qualification. Whether I teach in England, Scotland or elsewhere, who knows! All I know is that I want to make a difference to students’ lives, and the British Council experience certainly does that.’

Many, many thanks to Alex for this great update and best of luck with the interviews for teacher training that are coming up! We look forward to hearing how the rest of your time in Soissons goes.

‘Studying French felt like unlocking a map’

What better way to end the week than with another update from one of our former students? This time, we’re particularly pleased to be able to post an article by Emily who graduated with a BA Hons in French almost three years ago now:

‘I always wanted to be a firefighter, and I knew I didn’t need a degree for that. I suppose I went to university because it was expected, and I hoped that if my career in emergency services fell flat it would give me some qualifications to land on. I chose French because it felt like code-breaking, or unlocking a huge chunk of the map that was otherwise inaccessible. I grew an awful lot because of the opportunities I had to travel, teach and immerse myself. I did not actively pursue French after I graduated, but I was extremely proud of becoming bilingual. It opened up ways of thinking and lines of communication and connection that could never have existed otherwise, even when I speak English now. My best friend and my partner are both French speakers too, and no matter where I go or what job I have, I’ve noticed francophones popping up everywhere, delighted to be able to have a conversation in their own language abroad.

I made it into emergency services in the end. I moved to Australia with my partner a year after graduation, and although I was not accepted into the government-endorsed firefighters or paramedics on the first application, I kept going. I acquired qualifications in drug testing, paramedic health care, and firefighting response and rescue. Anyone interested in emergency work can get those things, but the background of travel, language/communication skills and higher education was also very desirable to recruiters in that field. Almost immediately I was privately contracting my services in the desert as an Emergency Services Officer, responsible for leading my own response team in HAZMAT emergencies, road crash, bushfire, vertical and confined space rescues. I also tend to patients from the residential mining town in the medical centre, which can be intense as the nearest large hospitals are several hours away even by helicopter. It sounds like a lot, in reality most of the job is just admin, drug tests for miners, and keeping everything clean and ready to go. Because the location is so remote, my work is fly in/fly out, so I spend a lot of time away from home. But I am doing what I love, and on my off-swings I still shake cocktails and mud wrestle at the city’s best gay club, so the party never ends!’

Many, many thanks to Emily for finding the time to send us through this great blog post and we’re delighted to hear that things are working out so well for you!

From Tour-Guiding and TEFL to International Marketing: ‘Language Skills and Cultural Knowledge’

2020 Feb Kitti MarseilleTime for another great update from one of our former students – after Paul’s tales of financial crime analysis, this time, we’re delighted to have news from Kitti who graduated just over two years ago:

‘My name is Kitti and I studied French and Global Cinema and Culture between 2013 and 2017. I really enjoyed my time at Stirling, I met some wonderful people, I learnt so much and I had a lot of fun. I spent a semester in the South of France studying at Aix-Marseille University. I was having a hard time with the accent, so I promised myself I would move back to a different part of France once I graduated.

2020 Feb Kitti Bordeaux TourShortly after graduating I moved to Bordeaux. I loved this gorgeous city from the moment I arrived. Everyone was kind and welcoming and I found the accent much more understandable. I started working on the reception of a youth hostel, and soon a local tour company hired me as one of their guides. I enjoyed every minute spent tour guiding. I learnt so many interesting things about the city and I met a lot of different people. I spent six months in Bordeaux, after which I returned to Scotland and started thinking of going into French teaching, even though I wasn’t 100% sure it was for me.

I completed my application, but I already had a TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) certificate, so I thought why not make some use of it and gain some experience before starting the PGDE course. I applied for a few TEFL jobs and I landed in a role in Madrid, Spain. I worked in two schools, a nursery and a so called ‘business vocational school’, which is similar to colleges in Scotland. I loved both of these jobs. However, I started giving evening classes for teenagers in a language school, which I didn’t enjoy as much. I found working with teenagers much harder than working with any other age group, and I started asking myself if teaching French in high schools is really the right path for me.

2020 Feb Kitti Cadiz

After returning to Scotland five months ago, instead of going for the PGDE, I decided to give myself a little more time to figure out what I really wanted to do. Since I have teaching experience, I got a job in a primary school, where I support children with learning difficulties. In the meantime, I kept wondering and asking myself what should my next step in life be. I do love working with children but I felt like there might be a more suitable path for me, so I kept searching for career options.

Recently I was accepted to study for a Masters at Edinburgh Napier University. The course is called International Marketing with Tourism and Events and it starts in September. I am over the moon and cannot wait for it to start. All modules sound as if they had been tailored to my interests. When I first read about the course, I couldn’t believe how perfect it all sounded. The year is split into three trimesters, two will take place in Edinburgh while the third one in Nice at IPAG Business School. I am most excited about studying festival management, as I hope one day I can work on film and music festivals. I am equally looking forward to working in settings where I can use my language skills and cultural knowledge. In the end I am happy I decided to take my time to figure out what I truly wanted, I am certain it will pay off. I just hope I will find the southern French accent easier to understand this time round.’

Many, many thanks to Kitti for finding the time to send us through this post and photos. We wish you all the best for the Masters next year and look forward to updates over the months and years ahead.