Tag: Law

Erasmus exchange / Mission Erasmus

Next week, we’re looking forward to hosting Joëlle Popineau, a colleague from our Erasmus partner institution the University of Tours, on a staff mobility exchange. More about her to follow in a moment but, coincidentally, our own Language Coordinator, Jean-Michel DesJacques has, in fact, just returned from an Erasmus staff mobility in Tours earlier this month so it seemed the perfect time for his post and some pictures:

IMG-20190226-WA0000‘As you can see from the title, the French version of this scheme seems a bit adventurous and almost secretive. Well, sorry to disappoint you but it was neither of those things. It was in fact well planned by my colleagues from the International Office here at Stirling and colleagues in Tours to whom I am very grateful, with a special mention to Magali Hassen-Orry who organised my timetable to suit the purpose of my visit. Thanks to a previous blog by one of our current exchange students Mairi, you know where Tours is, the Loire Valley and its châteaux.

It should be noted that my exchange occurred under the auspices of the Faculté de droit, the Law School. This is an important detail since the campus is outside the city but easily reached by tram (cheap and reliable integrated transport is a wonderful thing). Furthermore, the students I met and taught were not linguists. In fact English was not part of their degree per se but simply an element of the curriculum. It was fascinating to see how English for non-specialists was taught and how it was perceived by the students themselves. Le Centre de langue, equipped with everything you need to access English materials in any shape or form, plays a central part. Students were asked to work individually and in groups under the helpful supervision of a tutor for a two-hour period. I love the double-period concept, things can move at a slower pace but at the same time I feel that you can be a bit more ambitious with your aims and teaching methods. Time and a place dedicated to teaching languages made me feel rather envious.

It is perhaps self-evident but there is nothing like going somewhere else to see how things are done. I really believe in the virtue of the Erasmus exchange for staff and students. There is always something you can learn from your experience and I can’t help thinking how disastrous it would be if the Erasmus + programme were to suffer from the current political climate. This an ancient tradition from which we can all benefit. It would indeed be shameful for it to disappear from the UK’s academic landscape.

Et les gilets jaunes, alors? Well, I had to wait until my last day in Tours to see any. This was during a visit to le Musée des Beaux-Arts. There were about 15 of them, very active, asking lots of questions, marvelling at the paintings they were looking at. It was the school holidays and these gilets jaunes were about 6-7 years of age and part of a holiday camp which had organised a visit to the museum for Valentine’s day…

IMG-20190226-WA0001One final anecdote: On a visit to St. Gatien cathedral, by chance I approached a group of what my trained eye assumed to be Erasmus students listening to a talk. I was right. Our own students Mairi and Rhiannon were there, enjoying their class of histoire de l’art in the sunshine. I can’t wait to hear from them on their return.’

Many thanks to Jean-Michel for finding time amid the post-mid-semester marking to write and send us this great blog post (including that final picture of the slightly odd juxtaposition of a Tours shop window…) and more Tours-related posts to follow very soon…

Advertisements

French at Stirling: What happened next…

And following on from Evelyn’s post about Semester Abroad in Aix, another great article by Claudia who graduated in 2012 with a BA Hons in French (the same programme as Evelyn is doing, coincidentally…):

‘I think it must be a couple of years since I was last asked to contribute and let you all know about what happens when you graduate!

I have now taken a bit of a side step from French and I am a trainee legal executive at a law firm in sunny Dorset. My days are now filled with compliance, mortgages and completions instead of language, translation and reading but the skill set I learned at Stirling is transferred daily. For example, learning to translate French literature means I can now read leases and find the key passages with ease. Whilst I did not naturally find presentations and talking in front of the class easy, I can now confidently give advice to clients and speak up in meetings and at networking events.

With the rise of social media, Facebook kindly reminded me recently that it has been 10 years since I started my degree (September 2008) and 8 years since my student placement at Limoges University (January to May 2011). Whilst it may be a while since I graduated, it sure has gone by quickly and the University prepares you well for the world of work. I can’t believe I used to whinge at a 9am start- now that feels like a lie in!

Whilst I may not use French on a day-to-day basis the skills you learn are invaluable and you won’t even realise you are doing it. Legal work is challenging and long-distance learning is tough but the studying I did at Stirling has made me focused in my future career and when I feel I can’t do something I remind myself of all those nights that I wanted to give up and go home. I’m so glad I didn’t and there is no doubt in my mind that Cristina and Aedin kept me at university.

I’m hoping to go back to France soon and explore more of the beautiful cities that France has to offer; the world is bigger than the Pathfoot building, though it may feel as thought that is your world for 4 years. Hopefully the next time I get to write a post I might be a little closer to qualification. Keep an open mind- you never know where French will take you!’

Many, many thanks to Claudia for sending us this fantastic update and we look forward to following your progress in your legal career over the years ahead! And particular thanks from Cristina and Aedin – we’re delighted you stayed!!

‘The difference we can make to the world through translation’

Time for another catch-up with one of our recent graduates… Alex graduated with a BA Hons in French in 2017 and the past 18 months or so have seen him return to campus in a role that he hadn’t entirely anticipated at the time:

‘It’s been a little over a year since I wrote my first post for the Stirling Uni French blog and slowly but surely I’m adjusting to life outside of university; the initial fear of beginning the “rest of my life” has gone, and working Monday to Friday is becoming the norm – it’s really not that bad!

At the time of writing my last post I was about to embark on a Graduate Scheme with Enterprise Rent-A-Car. Since then, I have finished my time there and moved on to a new role as an Account Manager at Global Voices, a translation company based in Stirling – specifically at the Innovation Park on the university campus This means a number of my lunch breaks are still being spent at the Atrium, which I’m sure will be all-too-familiar for students past and present.

Working at a translation company has so far proven to be a fantastic experience. I’ve learnt so much about translation and interpretation; when I first started, I didn’t think there was anything to it – to me, translation was translation. In reality, there are so many factors to consider that I would never have thought of before I started, and no two language projects, let alone days, are the same. The variety is amazing – I find myself dealing with everything from translations of a couple of lines in length, to interpretation at technical events with thousands of people and numerous language combinations. I also never truly realised the extent to which translation work is required for business around the world – companies large and small will spend thousands of pounds a year out of necessity getting translation work done and companies in almost every discipline – from law to life science – have at the very least some kind of requirement.

What has struck me most, however, is the difference we can actually make to the world through translation work. When I went for my interview at the company, I asked my interviewer what the most satisfying part of his job was. He told me that whilst it was a great feeling helping the clients themselves, it’s about more than just the person you talk to about their requirements – you could be helping to translate something that could save thousands of lives through medical work, or could be stopping an innocent person from going to prison. This really stayed with me as it’s very easy to forget that when you get caught up trying to get the job.

If you are considering going down a translation career path, or want to learn more about the world of translation, the University does a fantastic Translation Studies post-graduate programme and I believe French at Stirling sometimes runs taster sessions for 4th year students who may be considering it as a future option (Cristina will confirm I’m sure!). It’s something I’d highly recommend. Of course, if you’re already confident about wanting to do translation or work in that sector then I would, of course, say that Global Voices is a fantastic place to gain experience and always looking for talented linguists and graduates. If you would like to consider this, speak to Cristina who can put you in touch with me and I’ll be happy to help.’

Many, many thanks to Alex for the great post and we’re delighted to hear that life in the world of translation is going so well!