Tag: Visual Cultures

Africa in Motion 2019 Programme Announced

As regular blog readers know, the annual Africa in Motion film festival was founded in 2006 by Lizelle Bisschoff, who was at the time a PhD student in the then School of Languages, Cultures and Religions at the University of Stirling, whose research project was supervised by David Murphy. 13 years on, Lizelle is now Senior Lecturer in Theatre, Film and TV Studies at the University of Glasgow, David is Professor of French at Strathclyde University, the School of Languages, Cultures and Religions is part of Stirling’s Division of Literature and Languages and Africa in Motion is still going strong with Justine Atkinson as the Festival Producer.

The festival has just released its programme for the 2019 edition which will run from 25 October to 3 November, with screenings and a wide range of other events in Glasgow and Edinburgh. The Division of Literature and Languages is particularly pleased to be the joint sponsor this year of the screening of Lost Warrior, a Somali-Danish coproduction being shown at the Edinburgh Filmhouse on 26 October. You can access the full programme of events via Africa in Motion’s website here. So much to choose from!

 

Advertisements

Welcome to Nina Parish!

Over the past 6 months or so, we’ve been able to report on a whole series of fantastic new appointments to French at Stirling starting with Beatrice Ivey, then Emeline Morin, then Aedín ní Loingsigh and finally Hannah Grayson who took up her post at the start of this year. And it’s with great delight that we get to welcome another new colleague in the shape of Nina Parish who will be joining us as Chair in French at the start of July. Nina is currently at the University of Bath and her research expertise encompasses representations of the migrant experience, difficult history and multilingualism within the museum space. She was part of the EU-funded Horizon 2020 UNREST team working on innovative memory practices in sites of trauma including war museums and mass graves. She is also an expert on the interaction between text and image in the field of modern and contemporary French Studies. She has published widely on this subject, in particular, on the poet and visual artist, Henri Michaux.

Our students will get their first chance to meet Nina in the Autumn semester and we’re all very much looking forward to working with her and doubtless gently persuading her to write a few blog posts along the way…

ACHAC’s ‘Human Zoos’ Exhibition: Scottish University Tour

As was mentioned way back in a February 2018 blogpost, these past few months David Murphy has been coordinating a poster tour, called ‘Putting People on Display’, which has visited 5 Scottish HEIs: Glasgow School of Art, Edinburgh, Stirling, St Andrews and Aberdeen. ‘Putting People on Display’ is a pared-down version of a major exhibition, ‘Human Zoos: the Invention of the Savage’, organised by the French colonial history research group, ACHAC, which was held at the Quai Branly Museum in Paris in 2011-12. Three additional posters focusing on the Scottish context were specially commissioned for this Scottish tour.

2018 David Putting People on Display Scottish National ExpoThe exhibition is made up of 22 banner-style posters charting the history of ‘putting people on display’. It covers a range of historical periods, geographical locations and national contexts, raises many questions about putting people on display, and the forms of observation these practices involve. Drawing on the rich iconography surrounding the phenomenon, it also forces us to address the ethics of display and the extent to which access to often challenging imagery is essential to understanding this historical practice and its contemporary afterlives. The exhibition was developed in association with the Lilian Thuram Foundation, and is part of a wider commitment to understanding the historical roots of contemporary racism – and to contributing to anti-racist education.

Each of the events held in conjunction with the exhibition has been very well attended. We had an audience of 100 at our launch event at Glasgow School of Art, and we organised a series of lunchtime tours in Stirling and St Andrews. Particularly fascinating was an event in St Andrews featuring speakers from the ‘Friends of Saughton Park’ in Edinburgh which was the site of a major ‘human zoo’ during the Scottish National Exhibition of 1908. The park will reopen in May 2019 after a long period of refurbishment, and it is likely that our ‘Putting People on Display’ exhibition will be included in the events to accompany the grand re-opening. So watch this space for more news as plans develop.

French at Stirling research: rap, parkour and visual cultures

The Summer is always a good time for a bit of a catch-up on news about research by French at Stirling colleagues and postgrads (past and present) so, if you’re looking for some pool-side reading, we would highly recommend:

‘Rapping through time: an analysis of non-standard language use in French rap’ by Martin Verbeke, who completed his PhD with us last year, and Bill Marshall’s latest article, ‘Imagining the First French Empire: Bande dessinée and the Atlantic.’ Current PhD student Fraser McQueen also has a new article in The Conversation about French President Emmanuel Macron. Bill has also been continuing his research on parkour with an invited lecture on parkour and visual arts at the Parkour Research and Development Forum at Gerlev (Denmark) earlier this month.

2017 Bill Parkour Research Forum Gerlev Jul17

More research updates to follow over the weeks ahead…

David Murphy at the Dak’art Arts Biennale

2016 Murphy Dakarts logo MayHaving just returned from a workshop at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, French at Stirling’s David Murphy is off to Senegal where he has been invited to speak about his research on the 1966 World Festival of Negro Arts at the Dak’art Biennale (3-21 May). He will be presenting two documentary films on the festival and leading a workshop as part of the programme run by Suba arts magazine. You can read more about David’s work on the 1966 Festival in his article in The Conversation here.