Tag: Quality of Life

‘A degree in French is hugely valued by employers’

It’s been a little while since we’ve had a chance to post some updates from former French at Scotland students but it’s great to get that started again with news from Paul who graduated with us nearly a decade ago. Last time we checked in with him, Paul had just started working as a Financial Crime Analyst in London and was enjoying the opportunities for travel and languages that career was opening up for him:

‘I studied French with Spanish at Stirling University between 2007 and 2011 which now feels like a lifetime ago. It’s a time I look back on with extreme fondness having had the opportunity to study abroad, indulge in my passion for foreign languages and cultures, make lifelong friends and even met my partner who I am still with to this day.

2020 Feb Paul London

After graduating I jumped around a few jobs in customer service and sales in Glasgow before finding myself on the rather unusual career path of counter financial crime within the banking industry, initially at a consultancy in London. Financial Crime work essentially involves making sure that banks are doing everything they can to prevent money laundering, terrorist financing, bribery & corruption and tax evasion, as well as making sure banks adhere to sanctions legislation set by governments. I have been fortunate to have had the opportunity to travel a lot in my short career including a six-month stint in Paris on a large project which gave me the opportunity to dust off my French language skills and work with people from across the globe.

After a brief stint working for the Scottish Government helping to deliver the new Scottish National Investment Bank, I’m now working for a global investment bank in their Edinburgh office working with various teams across Europe. My role is to make sure that the processes in place for identifying and reporting suspicious activity are robust and that colleagues across the bank are sufficiently trained to detect this type of activity. This involves daily communication with colleagues across various countries and time zones and frequently gives me the chance to use my language skills.

A degree in French has not only given me the perfect excuse for annual weekends away in France (just back from Toulouse which is well worth the visit) but I have found it to be hugely valued by employers who are increasingly working in an international setting and are placing more importance on communication skills. This has most certainly not been the career path I had originally envisioned for myself, but it has been hugely rewarding and has given me several opportunities to travel and use my degree in ways I wouldn’t have thought of.’

2020 Feb Paul Toulouse

Many, many thanks to Paul for finding the time to send through this blog post – it’s great to hear from you and to see that your career (and travels) are still going so well, and we look forward to more updates over the years ahead.

And on a related note, if you want to read more about the need for Languages graduates post-Brexit, there are interesting articles here and here and here (and many other places besides!).

Life as a French at Stirling graduate: Translation and walking tours of Bordeaux

A little over a year ago, the 2017 French at Stirling graduates and staff were enjoying a celebratory drink and speculating about plans for life after graduation. At that point, Kitti, who graduated in French and Global Cinema, wasn’t quite sure where life would take her, other than towards France. And it turns out she was right:

‘I’m doing great, currently living in Bordeaux with my boyfriend and I work as a tour guide in English and Hungarian, and soon in French too. They want to train me because they think my French is good enough – I hope I do as well as they expect me to! We do walking tours around the city as well as different wine and food tasting tours. I love my job. I have a lot of fun working and I meet a lot of interesting people.

We are planning to stay in Bordeaux until the end of September for sure, then we are thinking of moving to Melbourne for the winter (well, to avoid the winter…), but we are not sure, we will see how things work out. For now, I’m working hard on my French and have made a lot of French friends. Luckily, everyone is very nice in Bordeaux and the city itself is stunning. If you ever visit let me know and I’ll take you on my tours for free!! So, for now I’m working on my French and I’m hoping to work with translators after the summer, either in an office or shadow and freelancer, because this is the field where I’d like to work and I have experience with interpreting (thanks to a job French at Stirling helped me find while still a student which provided me with jobs for a full year before I moved away to France) but I need more experience with translation. After that, I would like to set up my own business and work for myself.’

Many, many thanks to Kitti for the great blog post (and the invitation to a free tour of Bordeaux…) and we look forward to following your travels and your career over the months and years ahead.

Final year: ‘A mix of hard work, excitement and nostalgia’

The countdown to graduation (on Thursday for most of our students…) has started so it’s something of a scramble to get life-after-graduation posts up on the blog in time but a fun scramble! This time, it’s one of this year’s finalists, Alex who is about to graduate in International Politics and Modern Languages and who has sent a post reflecting, as he puts it, on the ‘past-future questions’ that arise as you reach the end of your studies:

2018 Alex Sorlei Pizza Maker June18‘What will you do next? That’s the million-dollar question that you get from friends, family and university professors. But for me the question to ask a student who has just finished his four years of study is a different one. My question for me would be: how were these four years for you?

Most of them would start by saying that the first year is the most exciting one because you meet lots of people from all around the world. A new world of opportunity and knowledge opens up for you and you learn things you would have never thought you would. Most of them will remember about “international dinners” where they would have twelve or more different nationalities who got together and each cooked a typical dish from their country. Some will remember signing up for all these sports clubs and societies and unfortunately not having time to attend activities for all of them. They will remember how hard it was to choose one over another.

Then they will remember how university life became something normal and how Freshers’ week was a time when the campus was off limits. Too crowded, too many Freshers. They will remember the dozen CVs they handed in and their first job as a waiter, cleaner or other roles.

After the first two years they will tell you that from the third year onwards studies will take over your social life. No more clubbing, limited sport, junk food and long nights in the library. Those who go on Erasmus will tell you that going abroad was their best ever experience. Some will say the contrary.

About the fourth year they will tell you that it’s a mix of hard work, excitement and nostalgia. All happening at the same time. You will reflect back to your first year and you will realise how much you have achieved and how mature you have become in so little time.

When you ask them what will they do next many will not know the answer straight away. For me the answer is that during my four years of university I managed to learn many things that will help me with my future plans. It’s not necessarily about the new language that I learned nor how international organisations work, but how to treat people, talk to people and, most importantly, to respect people. That will help me in my mission to bring Neapolitan pizza to as many people as I can and to change the view of those who consider pizza unhealthy and greasy.

I am studying to become a professional pizza chef as I want to be able to have the knowledge to teach as many people as I can to make their own pizza at home. I want to learn more about the ingredients, nutrition and the food industry in general. I believe this will be a very interesting and important matter in the future as more and more people realise the importance of good alimentation. Food waste is also very interesting and something that needs more focus on.

2018 Alex Sorlei Pizza Maker II June18After the Stirling opening, I’ve attracted lots of interest from investors and I am now opening a second location in Edinburgh. After this new opening I would like to open other two locations (still investor interest) but not more than that. I want to keep Napizza at four and not more locations. I don’t want to become a “monster business” like the big chains. I believe you should work for a standard of life where you can fully enjoy it. If you work too much you will get older and older and all you time will fade away. We live now, and we need to enjoy our life now, not in ten or fifteen years when who knows if we will still be able to enjoy it or not.

I am also building a three-wheel van with an oven on the back in order to attend events, shows or just parties. Moreover, I want Napizza to become socially responsible and I am always looking for charities to support and create events that will help the community that Napizza is in. I am also planning to create some urban gardens and grow vegetables either for Napizza or personal use. Finally, I hope I will be able to find the time and do some consulting for pizzerias as this is something that I like doing more and more every day.

My philosophy at the moment is to work 20% of my time and 80% to plan and enjoy life. I am all about making mistakes and learning from them but the mistake that I am afraid to make is to work for something that will never come. I live now, therefore I try to enjoy these moments NOW and not later.

For the future I hope to live by the 20/80% rule and enjoy more my moments of life.’

Many thanks to Alex for the great blog post and we wish you all the best for the future, both in terms of your business plans and the 20/80 rule!

Stirling Postgrad Journal CFP

The editors of Stirling’s postgraduate journal Stryvling are currently looking for articles for an issue dedicated to the topic of ‘Quality of Life’.  The CFP closes in May 2016 and follows here:

‘The Stirling International Journal of Postgraduate Research is a peer-reviewed research journal published by postgraduate students at the University of Stirling. Its objective is to attract high quality, original, multidisciplinary research articles and book reviews for publication in theme-driven issues. The theme of our upcoming, third issue is ‘quality of life’. The journal is aimed at an international audience and will be published online in open access mode.

‘To read some analyses, you would think that [the protests in France of May] 1968 took place in the heads of a few Parisian intellectuals. We must therefore remember that it is the product of a long chain of world events, and a series of currents of international thought, that already linked the emergence of new forms of struggle to the production of a new subjectivity, if only in its critique of centralism and its qualitative claims concerning the quality of life’. – Gilles Deleuze

The Stirling International Journal of Postgraduate Research seeks articles on the subject of the continual political and technological mechanisms exerted upon the quality of life, and the varied human responses to these mechanisms. How have the sciences of politics, education, law, and the arts shaped quality of life and our very notions of it? We are looking for articles of between 5000 and 7000 words on the topic relating but not limited to the following fields: aquaculture, film studies, history, law, literature, nursing, philosophy, politics, physiotherapy, psychology, sociology and software engineering. The deadline for submission of abstracts of roughly 400 words is May 2016. Please email your abstracts to one of the following email addresses: maurodilullo@stir.ac.uk, sbatrawy@yahoo.com, or s.l.lindsay@stir.ac.uk.’

Submissions relating to France and the wider Francophone world are very welcome!