Tag: Memory

Publication News: Handbook of French Politics and Culture

2020 Jan Publication Handbook cover NinaWe’re delighted to announce (albeit a little belatedly!) the publication of the new Routledge Handbook of French Politics and Culture which has, among its co-editors, French at Stirling’s own Nina Parish who has this to say about the volume:

‘I’m really delighted to announce the publication of The Routledge Handbook of French Politics and Culture. I’ve been working on this handbook for a number of years now with my colleagues, Marion Demossier (University of Southampton), David Lees (University of Warwick) and Aurelien Mondon (University of Bath). We wanted to provide a fresh look at some of the questions raised by modern and contemporary French politics and culture. Many of the chapters will help to understand what is happening with current strikes and protests in France about pension reform (eg. ‘La France dans la rue’ by Chris Reynolds, Nottingham Trent University). The handbook is divided into four sections: ‘Politics in Modern and Contemporary France’; ‘Identification and Belonging’; ‘Spaces of Political and Cultural Contestation’ and ‘Mediating Memories and Cultures’ (including my co-authored chapter with Eleanor Rowley on ‘Remembering the First World War in France: Historial de la Grande Guerre and Thiepval’ in this final section). It was difficult to know when to submit the final manuscript as it seemed as if the political and cultural shape of France was constantly changing. The final changes were requested of relevant authors following the ‘gilets jaunes’ phenomenon last autumn. Full details of the handbook, including a complete list of chapters and contributors, can be found here.

Many thanks to Nina for sending us through this blog post and, to all blog readers, Bonne Année from all in French at Stirling! And bonne lecture!

Articles, Books and Conferences

As well as launching language websites and giving introductions to films, French at Stirling colleagues and students have been up to all sorts of French-related activities over recent weeks. More on some of these will doubtless follow in due course but, by way of a quick overview…

Anyone with an interest in contemporary French politics and society should look out for Fiona Barclay’s article ‘French citizenship campaigners may find acceptance depends on far more than official papers’ published online in The Conversation in early October. Fiona also gave a talk at the Alliance française in Glasgow on 5th November about the French settlers of Algeria which included a local pied-noir amongst the attendees.

Fiona and Beatrice’s Ivey’s MOOC ‘Remembering Empire’ is coming to the end of its first run with around 350 people registered at the last count. The MOOC will be left open for new participants to join and will remain live until April so it’s not too late to sign up!

Next week will see a fine Stirling contingent giving papers on a wide range of topics at the annual Society for French Postcolonial Studies conference in London. This year’s conference theme is ‘Postcolonial Realms of Memory in the Francophone World.’ Fiona and Beatrice are both giving papers as part of a panel on ‘Memories of Algeria’, along with Susan Ireland of Grinnell College. Fiona’s paper is on ‘Fraternity in French Algeria: (post-)colonial conceptions of republican citizenry’, while Beatrice will be talking about ‘Ahmed Kalouaz, Childhood and Colonial Memory in Ecriture Jeunesse.’ Fraser McQueen is the third member of the Stirling cohort, with his paper on ‘Memories of Empire in France’s Literary Grands Remplacements.’

2019 Nov Rwanda since 1994 Hannah coverHannah Grayson has two co-edited volumes that have come out over the past few months: Rwanda since 1994: Stories of Change published by Liverpool University Press and After the Genocide in Rwanda: Testimonies of Violence, Change and Reconciliation with IB Tauris. And to return to the online publication The Conversation, our French and Translation colleague, Aedín ní Loingsigh is one of the co-authors of this fantastic article on bilingualism and dementia: ‘Bilingualism and dementia: how some patients lose their second language and rediscover their first.’ Aedín’s co-authors are Ingeborg Birnie (Strathclyde), Thomas Bak (Edinburgh) and our former Stirling colleague, David Murphy (Strathclyde).

More news to follow!

Remembering French Algeria

As well as catching up with graduates of French at Stirling, it’s good to get the opportunity to find out more about what our current colleagues are up to so we’re particularly pleased to be able to post the following article by Beatrice Ivey, who works with us as a post-doctoral researcher:

‘Since September 2018, I have been working with Fiona Barclay on her AHRC-funded project ‘Narratives and Representations of the French Settlers of Algeria’. I have two main roles on the project: first, to research ‘pied-noir’ memory culture, and second, to introduce the project’s research findings to the public.

Research

2019 Beatrice Pcards Alger-1930-1-dOrléansIn my research role, I have presented at two conferences (Digital Diasporas and the Society for the Study of French History) and am in the process of finishing an article on the circulation of colonial-era postcards online among amateur websites dedicated to ‘pied-noir’ memory and history. On the one hand, I have found a great deal of continuity between the postcards’ original purpose (to advertise the empire to the metropole and abroad) and their contemporary purpose as vectors of colonial nostalgia. On the other hand, I have noticed that these postcards also appear in surprising new contexts, fostering nostalgia that does not necessarily apply to the ‘pieds-noirs’ alone.

2019 Beatrice Pcards Benisaf-Rue-Republique

Public engagement

As part of my public engagement role, Fiona and I have launched a Massive Open Online Course with Iversity entitled ‘Remembering Empire’. This is a free online course which examines narratives of settler colonialism in Algeria through two differing models of memory: one based on competition, the other based on implication. By studying a mixture of archive footage, artefacts, and extracts from literary and journalistic texts, we think this is a pertinent case study for understanding how empire is remembered and forgotten in Europe today.

The course will launch on 17th October and then again on 21st November, running for 5 weeks each time with each unit lasting about an hour. The course is open for anyone to register, so do check it out here.’

Many thanks to Beatrice for finding the time to send us through this article and we would encourage all blog readers to sign up for what looks like a fantastic online course! And thanks also to the ‘La Mer à Boire’ society and the Redoute Béar Museum in Port-Vendres for their kind permission to reproduce the postcards.

Welcome to Nina Parish!

Over the past 6 months or so, we’ve been able to report on a whole series of fantastic new appointments to French at Stirling starting with Beatrice Ivey, then Emeline Morin, then Aedín ní Loingsigh and finally Hannah Grayson who took up her post at the start of this year. And it’s with great delight that we get to welcome another new colleague in the shape of Nina Parish who will be joining us as Chair in French at the start of July. Nina is currently at the University of Bath and her research expertise encompasses representations of the migrant experience, difficult history and multilingualism within the museum space. She was part of the EU-funded Horizon 2020 UNREST team working on innovative memory practices in sites of trauma including war museums and mass graves. She is also an expert on the interaction between text and image in the field of modern and contemporary French Studies. She has published widely on this subject, in particular, on the poet and visual artist, Henri Michaux.

Our students will get their first chance to meet Nina in the Autumn semester and we’re all very much looking forward to working with her and doubtless gently persuading her to write a few blog posts along the way…