Tag: French Film Festival

French Film Festival Screening at MacRobert

As often happens as the pace of the semester increases, the blog has taken a bit of a backseat over the past few weeks. However, there are lots of posts building up and lots of news to share about French at Stirling colleagues and students so there will hopefully be a bit of a catch-up over the coming days.

To start with, we’re delighted to announce that, in partnership with French Film Festival UK, Dr Fiona Barclay’s AHRC project at Stirling is hosting a screening of the documentary Libre/To The Four Winds at the MacRobert Arts Centre on campus on Wednesday November 27th. The documentary follows Cédric Herrou, a French farmer arrested for ‘crimes of solidarity’ when he helped people crossing from Italy make their asylum claims on French territory.

Dr Beatrice Ivey will briefly introduce the film with some background and updates on the situation of migrant activism in France today. The film will then be followed by a roundtable discussion with volunteers from Refuweegees and Forth Valley Welcome, two organisations that help refugees in Scotland.

All are welcome to the screening and the discussion that will follow and tickets can be purchased online here or at the MacRobert Box Office. And please do also check out the other French Film Festival films coming to the MacRobert over the next couple of weeks.

Languages at University: Travel, Opportunities, Employability!

As regular blog readers will know, we have a great network of school-based contacts and our students often go out into local schools to act as Language Ambassadors. On occasions, we also welcome groups of students here to Stirling and we were delighted to get a chance for a group of our students to meet with pupils from a local secondary school back in November when they came to campus as part of the MacRobert’s French Film Festival screenings. The visit went really well and we’re grateful to Alex (one of our Year 4 students who met with the pupils) for taking the time to send us this post on what happened:

‘On Tuesday 27 November, a group of 23 pupils from Queen Victoria School in Dunblane visited the University of Stirling for the afternoon. Their day consisted of a French Film Festival screening followed by a discussion session with students currently at the university.

There were 6 of us there to give the pupils an insight into what it was like to study French and Languages in general at university, and in certain areas specific to Stirling. The presenting group of students was made up of 3rd and 4th years, studying a range of different degree programmes including French with Spanish, Mathematics and Business Studies.

Across the board, there were some key reasons we gave as to why you should study languages (including French) at university to the school pupils in question, and more broadly for anyone thinking of studying languages at university:

Firstly, studying a language is hugely important for communication skills regardless of whether you are speaking in your native or in a foreign language. The ability to communicate with all types of people in a variety of ways is a great attribute to put on your CV. It is also a very social subject, meaning you are likely to make more friends studying French than a subject that is much more lecture-based and less interactive.

Secondly, the opportunity to study or live abroad! Arguably languages bring more benefits than any other degree in terms of time abroad, especially when it comes to improving your level of language. All but one of the students presenting had already been on an experience abroad, either to study in a partner institution or to teach English in Francophone countries, as part of their degree. All of us agreed that those experiences had positively contributed towards our degree as well as our future post university. The other student was about to head off on study abroad and was very excited at the prospect of the opportunity.

Finally, studying languages gives you the opportunity to immerse yourself in another culture. Despite France being one of our closest neighbours geographically, the cultural experience is quite different to that in the UK. From our perspective as students, getting into a routine of listening to and reading French regularly has such a positive impact when immersing into this new experience. And in particular, when you are abroad, students will find it so much easier to communicate with the locals on their semester away.

On behalf of the 6 presenting students and the Languages department, we’d like to thank Queen Victoria School for coming to the university and wish the best of luck to the pupils with all their exams in the near future. In the next few years, you may even be studying here!’

And I’d just echo Alex’s thanks here, both to the pupils from QVS (and their teacher, Laura Bairner) and to our 6 Stirling students for answering their questions!

Experiences of Exile: Week of Events

The University of Stirling is hosting a special week of events under the theme ‘Experiences of Exile’ to launch the new exhibition in the Pathfoot Gallery of the same name.

2018 Ivey un-balcon-sur-la-mer-1A View of Love Screening, 8th November, 4.30/5.30pm

Kicking us off the Macrobert Arts Centre is hosting a special screening of A View of Love/Un Balcon sur la mer (2010 dir. Nicole Garcia) as part of the French Film Festival programmeA View of Love is a romantic mystery film about three French children who left Algeria very suddenly during the last violent months of the War of Independence in 1962. The film moves between past and present as the characters, now adults in France, rediscover each other and their past. It illustrates how the nostalgia of the French settlers who lived in Algeria before it became independent, opens the door to the unexpected return of the past.

The film will be preceded at 4.30pm by an introductory talk by Dr Fiona Barclay. Her talk unpacks the emotional and historical attachments which linked Algeria to France for over a century, and which continue to shape the lives of millions living in France today. You can book tickets directly from the Macrobert Art Centre here.

2018 Ivey eudream801Photographer Anna Pantelia presents: The European Dream, 13th November, 3pm

The photographer Anna Pantelia, will discuss her current exhibition ‘The European Dream’ which is on display in the Pathfoot Gallery. Anna Pantelia is an award-winning photojournalist and the Field Communications Manager for Médecins Sans Frontières. She was the official photographer for CERN between 2012-2014. Her photography and interviews have appeared in Newsweek, CNN, Al Jazeera, BBC, The Telegraph, The Guardian, Vice News etc. She has worked in Europe, Turkey, South Sudan and Mozambique as a freelancer photographer with international NGOs such as Action Aid, Save the Children, and CARE International. (Oscars, Pathfoot Building, 3pm).

2018 Ivey autumn-art-lecture-2018-1920x689

Autumn Art Lecture, with Professor Alison Phipps, UNESCO Chair: Refugee integration through languages and the arts (University of Glasgow)

Pathfoot Lecture Theatre, 15th November, 5.30pm

Entitled ‘Drift. Float. Drown. Dance: Reflections on refuge from a calabash’, the lecture will reflect on a translational study in Ghana. It saw researchers work alongside a dance company, who expressed the themes of the research in dance form. Places are free for the event but must be booked in advance here.

Many thanks to Beatrice Ivey, Research Assistant on Fiona Barclay’s project, for sending us all this information and we hope to see many of you at these events!

New Semester

It’s already the end of our first week of the new semester here at Stirling so time for a quick round-up of our news. It’s been a busy little run up to the start of teaching here: new colleagues, great First Year numbers and those starting in our Advanced stream have been benefiting from our Bridging Materials, French at Stirling has been rated No.3 in Scotland and in the top 20 in the UK by the 2019 Complete University Guide… A period of great change and excitement!

Where to start? ‘New colleagues’ seems a good place. Beatrice Ivey, Research Assistant on Fiona Barclay’s AHRC Leadership project, is now in Stirling and settling into Divisional life. She and Fiona are working on the organisation of the exhibition that forms part of the project, more on which soon. We’ve also welcomed Emeline Morin who has joined us as a Lecturer in French for the next two years. Emeline’s research interests lie in comparative literature and fairytales and she’s teaching with us across a wide range of courses.

Alongside Emeline, two other new lecturers will be joining us over the months ahead. Aedín ní Loingsigh will be starting in October, with Hannah Grayson taking up her post in January. Hannah’s recent work has been on the Rwandan Stories of Change project at St Andrews. Much as we were sad to see Bill Marshall retire, it’s great to get a chance to welcome a fantastic group of new colleagues and we’re looking forward to working with them. We’ve also got some new faces among the Teaching Assistants who work as part of our Language team (with Language Coordinator, Jean-Michel DesJacques, Mathilde Mazau and Brigitte Depret): Fanny Lacôte and Fraser McQueen who have taught with us before are joined by Aurélie Noël who has previously taught at the University of Glasgow.

2018 Hornberger VIIAs ever, the start of the new semester also means welcoming back our students. Our finalists are back from their Semester Abroad (in France, Quebec, Morocco, Switzerland… or Hispanophone destinations for those doing French and Spanish) and our Year 3 students are about to start the process to select their destination for their Semester Abroad. With that in mind, Jean-Michel DesJacques, Jose Ferreira-Cayuela and Cristina Johnston are organising their annual get-together at the end of September that gives all those students a chance to meet over wine and nibbles to talk about Study Abroad and to exchange questions and tips. All the University’s incoming exchange students from French or Spanish-speaking partner institutions are also invited and it’s a great chance for the different groups of students to get to know each other.

2018 Nicolas Masdorp Pic I

Some of those incoming French-language exchange students are also currently being recruited to lead informal conversation sessions for students in a range of year groups, to offer a further opportunity for spoken language practice beyond the weekly tuition offered by our Language team.

And, of course, we have a great cohort of Year 2 students, many of whom will be applying for English Language Assistantships over the course of this year (welcome back to those who were ELAs last year!). For the first half of our second year, we run an Intermediate class for those who started as complete beginners with us in Year 1 and it’s great to see that numbers on that module are even higher than last year.

Finalists back from Semester Abroad, Year 3 students planning time abroad, students settling into Year 2 and good numbers of Year 1 students which is fantastic to see. Those on the Advanced stream – taking French with a wide range of other subjects – have been working their way through the Bridging Materials that we put together for incoming students each year, to help smooth the transition from secondary school language study to University-level language learning. And those on our Beginners’ stream are about to plunge into the intensive programme of language learning that will introduce them to French and build their confidence and ability as the weeks progress.

A great group of undergraduates and an enthusiastic intake of students on the French stream of our Translation and Translation with TESOL programmes who will work under the guidance of French at Stirling staff on their translation portfolios and, ultimately, on their dissertation projects. It’s been particularly nice to see some familiar faces on those programmes with recent graduates returning to undertake postgrad work with us (as well as across other TPG programmes at Stirling, of course).

As in previous years, we’ll be posting profiles of our students regularly, partly to catch up with those who’ve written for us before and to get a sense of how their studies are progressing, and partly to introduce you to some of our new Year 1 intake, so keep an eye on these pages!

2018 FFF Logo

As for French at Stirling colleagues, lots of news to report there, too. Fiona Barclay, Beatrice Ivey and Cristina Johnston are in discussions with the MacRobert’s film programmer, Grahame Reid, to finalise a programme of French Film Festival screenings that will take place at the MacRobert later in the semester. Details to follow but expect some great new French-language films! (It’s not directly French-related but do also check out Grahame’s Central Scotland Documentary Festival at the MacRobert from 4-8 October – a fantastic programme of documentaries lies ahead!) And on another film-related note, David Murphy will be involved with the Africa in Motion festival in November – more on which soon…

2018 Cent Scot Docu Fest

2018 AiM Logo

 

 

 

 

Aedín ní Loingsigh will be participating in a workpshop on Interdisciplinarity at the Université de Limoges in December and Elizabeth Ezra gave a paper in June at the Contemporary Childhood Conference at the University of Strathclyde examining the witch-familiar relationships in Harry Potter and His Dark Materials. Elizabeth has also just signed a contract for a book, co-edited with Catherine Wheatley of KCL entitled Shoe Reels: The History and Philosophy of Footwear in Film, which will be published by EUP in 2020. And with her non-academic hat on, Elizabeth will be talking about her children’s book Ruby McCracken at the Wigtown Book Festival later this month.

2018 Ruby McCracken

This weekend, while staff and students from French and Spanish are talking to prospective students at Stirling University’s Open Day (15 September – come and see us!), Jean-Michel DesJacques is off to Dundee where he’ll be taking part in the 25th Anniversary Conference UCML Scotland​: Looking inward and outward. Jean-Michel will be meeting actors from all education sectors from Primary to higher education. The 1+2 language initiative will be high on the agenda but not exclusively since challenges and issues in languages are multiple and complex.

And our Phd student Fraser McQueen has been presenting his work across a range of conferences since the Spring, including the ASMCF Postgraduate Study Day at the IMLR (where he spoke about Islamophobia and anti-Semitism in France), the Society for French Studies Postgraduate Study day at UCL (with a paper on female radicalisation fiction), Stirling’s own annual Arts and Humanities Postgraduate Research Conference and the Society for Francophone Postcolonial Studies Postgraduate Study Day at Birmingham. Fraser also co-organised the SGSAH Second Year PG Symposium in Glasgow in June and presented his own work there, too.

There is much, much more that we could include here but that seems a good taste of what’s going on to start things off this semester. More to follow over the weeks ahead! In the meantime, many thanks to the students whose photos from last semester abroad have made their way into this post and bon weekend!

Research at Stirling: Exhibitions, Conferences and Interactive Maps

A Summer of changes for French at Stirling, not only with new cohorts of students coming to join us and our ELAs and Study Abroad students returning, but also on the staffing front. As we’ve mentioned here before, Bill Marshall retires at the end of next month and we are currently advertising for two new lecturers so there’ll be new faces in the teaching team over the months ahead. And, as we’ve also spoken about on the blog, Fiona Barclay – who has been on research leave this past semester – was awarded an AHRC Early Career Researcher Leadership Fellowship so we’re also appointing a fixed-term lecturer to replace Fiona for the next two years. We’re looking forward to introducing you to these yet-to-be-appointed colleagues very soon but, first, we thought it’d be good to get Fiona to tell us a bit about what she’s been up to over these past few months and what lies ahead. And that also gives us an excellent excuse to introduce Dr Beatrice Ivey who was recently appointed to work as a Postdoctoral Research Assistant with Fiona and who we’re very excited to welcome to Stirling!

‘Greetings from the sunny south of France, where I’ve just finished my semester of research leave! Stirling seems very far away but as the semester comes to a close it’s a good time to look back on the last few months and reflect on plans, progress, and the inevitable changes that happen…

I came to France in January with the plan of writing a couple of chapters of the book that I’m working on, using local libraries, and accessing some archives. The book is on the European settlers who came to Algeria following its conquest by the French in 1830. Almost all of them – 900,000 – were forced to leave for France when Algeria became independent in 1962 in one of the biggest population movements since 1945. Since then, a proportion of them have been very vocal in French politics, whilst others have produced a large corpus of literature which records their memories of their homeland and works through their feelings of loss and nostalgia. My project looks at these narratives and representations, and the ways in which the community’s identity is being passed on to the younger generations born in France since 1962.

Plans are often subject to change, and so it was on this occasion. My idea of using the local university library ran into trouble straightaway, when I discovered that, due to a combination of a local strike against university mergers, and the subsequent national blockade of universities, it was closed until further notice. In the end ‘until further notice’ meant nearly 5 months, giving me a new perspective on the UK’s UCU strike action, and a lot of sympathy for local students who were still expected to sit exams. Thankfully Stirling’s electronic library holdings and lending provision has developed a lot in the last few years, so I was able to access most of the texts needed.

2018 Fiona Barclay Research Leave Blog Pic
Le Voyageur

The second change to my plans came in February, when I received news that my application to the AHRC’s Leadership Fellows scheme had been successful. The award is £250,000 for a two-year project starting next month and, in addition to the completion of the book, it has a substantial set of public engagement activities, some of which will start early in the project. Consequently, I’ve spent much of the last few months working with colleagues in museums and archives in Paris, Perpignan and Port-Vendres to organise access to images, video testimonies, artefacts and so on. These will feature in a year-long exhibition opening in September at the Pathfoot Gallery in Stirling. I’m also working with colleagues at Stirling to build a new project website, which will feature an interactive map giving access to many of the images, videos and sound-files, as well as links to a free access online course (MOOC) and film season taking place as part of the UK French Film Festival in November 2018.

The project will also have another team member, a Postdoctoral Research Assistant who will work on the project for 15 months. I’m delighted that Dr Beatrice Ivey, who recently completed her PhD at the University of Leeds, will be starting at Stirling on 1 September. She will be leading on many of the digital and online parts of the project, and also co-organising an international conference on forced migration which will take place at Stirling next May. We look forward to welcoming her to Stirling!’

Many thanks to Fiona for this update – news of the exhibition and other events will follow in due course! – and over to Beatrice:

‘I’m joining the ‘From Colonisers to Refugees’ project at the University of Stirling as a Post-Doctoral Research Assistant and, in this role, I’ll be assisting Dr Fiona Barclay with the management of the project website, the organisation of an international conference at Stirling in 2019, research and publication as part of a planned special issue. I will also interview people who have settled in Scotland having fled Syria as refugees for the project’s Digital Cartographies and Storytelling Soundscapes components.

I completed my PhD at the University of Leeds in 2018, examining the gender performativity of cultural memory in writings by Assia Djebar, Hélène Cixous, Ahmed Kalouaz, Malika Mokeddem, and Nina Bouraoui. My thesis, entitled ‘Performing Gender, Performing the Past’ argued that acts of cultural memory also reiterate, and possibly subvert, the gendered imaginaries associated with French colonialism in Algeria. I examined specific cases of gendered memory which produced connections between the memory of French Algeria and other disparate histories of extreme violence, such as the Holocaust, Partition, Slavery in the Caribbean, and the ongoing ‘Border Crisis’ (Daniel Trilling 2017) in the Mediterranean. I have published a chapter ‘Hélène Cixous’s L’Indiade ou l’Inde de leurs rêves: Gendering Memories of Colonialism in Algeria and India’ in the volume French Feminisms 1975 and After (Atack, Fell, Holmes, Long 2018) and an article ‘Affect, Gender, and Postmemory in Nina Bouraoui’s Representations of the 1970s’ in the International Journal of Francophone Studies. 

My current research focuses on the transnational memory of forced migration in Francophone cultural production from and about the Indian Ocean, the Mediterranean, and the Caribbean.’

Many thanks to Beatrice and Fiona for these posts, and good luck with the project!

French Film Festival comes to the MacRobert

French at Stirling is delighted to announce that a series of films from the annual French Film Festival will be screening at the MacRobert on various dates over the course of November. Building on the success of last year’s festival screenings, the MacRobert’s Film Programmer Grahame Reid explains: ‘For the second year in a row, we are delighted to partner with French at University of Stirling and be part of the UK-wide French Film Festival to bring more screenings from the crème de la crème of French-speaking cinema than ever before!’

Screenings start this Thursday (2 November) at 7.30 with La Fille de Brest, followed by Patients on Thursday 9 November at 7.30. On Monday 20 November, there’s a screening of Marie Curie: The Courage of Knowledge and then, on Thursday 23 November, the screening of Mercenaire will be preceded by a public lecture by Professor Bill Marshall at 5.30 and a reception sponsored by Erasmus@30 and Stirling’s International Office. The season of French Film Festival films will come to a close with L’Amant Double on Thursday 30 November.

Full details of all the films and screenings can be found on the MacRobert Cinema webpages. All screenings are open to the general public.

Venez nombreux!

Publications, progress reviews and teaching: a year in the life of a PhD student

This semester seems to be flying past and it doesn’t entirely seem possible that we should already be a week or so away from our mid-semester break. Our Year 1 students have just received feedback on the essays they wrote as part of our package of Bridging Materials, assessment deadlines are starting to fall for this semester’s modules, the schedule of films for Stirling’s section of the French Film Festival has made its way into the MacRobert programme… Against that busy backdrop, it’s good to get a chance to reflect on what a year in the life of French at Stirling can look like, from the perspective of one of our PhD students, Fraser McQueen who has very kindly made time to send us this blog post:

“I came back to Stirling to start my Ph.D in French Studies in October 2016, having originally graduated with a degree in French and History in 2014 before going to St Andrews to do an MLitt in French Studies and then spending a year teaching English as a lecteur at the Université de Toulon. I came back to Stirling mostly because I thought that it was the best place in Scotland for my project, given the department’s strategic focus on colonial and postcolonial studies, but also because I’d enjoyed my time here before. If it seems like a year is a long time to leave it before writing a blog post, I’m the only one to blame: I’ve been promising to do this for several months now!

I’ve just passed the first year review of my Ph.D, which means that I’m officially allowed to progress into the second year: the review process, during which I had to answer questions from three academics on the work I’ve produced so far, was quite stressful but also very helfpul in showing me the areas in which I still have a lot of work to do.

Overall, I’ve enjoyed the first year of my Ph.D. I research representations of Islamophobia and coexistence in contemporary French literature and film: I believe that this is an extremely important subject, and it’s been great to have the chance to research it in depth.

I’ve also enjoyed the other opportunities that come with doing a Ph.D: I’ve presented at three conferences and had four articles published in The Conversation, a news and opinion website via which academics from Ph.D level upwards are able to share their research with a non-specialist audience. This is something that I’ve particularly enjoyed: I think that it’s important to communicate academic research to people outside of academia, particularly with projects like mine, and The Conversation is a great way to do that. Writing for non-specialists has also really helped me to write more clearly: I used to have a bad habit of writing huge sentences filled with jargon, which their professional editors wouldn’t allow. Although I can’t use the exact same style for my academic writing as I would in The Conversation, the experience of needing to be more concise has definitely helped and I’d strongly recommend that other Ph.D students try writing for them.

I also had my first journal article published in Modern and Contemporary France last week, which I’m really pleased with. Getting it through peer review was a very long process – I originally submitted it last November – but I feel that the article is much better for it. I also had a book review published in Modern and Contemporary France earlier in the year, and am now working on another journal article which I hope to submit elsewhere in the next month or so. I’m enjoying all of this, but trying to balance it all out with actually doing my research and writing my thesis can be tricky at times!

Problems balancing my workload and the occasional stress of writing to one side, though, I’ve really enjoyed the first year of my Ph.D. Over the next year I’m hoping to get draft versions of four of my thesis chapters written: it’ll be a challenge, especially given that I’m now also teaching undergraduates, but it’s one that I’m looking forward to.”

Many thanks to Fraser for taking the time to write this and congratulations on the progress review success, as well as on the publications front!