Tag: Football

‘You might get knocked back a few times but your time will come!’

We’re on something of a roll at the moment with posts from former French at Stirling students, allowing us to paint a great picture of the variety of routes degrees involving languages can take you down, from financial crime analysis to tour-guiding and TEFL, from British Council Language Assistantships to the emergency services, via some thoughts on how to find ways to keep your language/s going after graduation… Today’s post takes in translation, postgraduate studies, proofreading, subtitling and teaching, courtesy of Stewart who graduated with a BA Hons in French and Spanish in 2015:

‘It’s been over 3 years since I graduated from Stirling now. A lot has changed in my life in that time. Some for the better, some for the worse. When I left Stirling, I had grand plans about what I could do with my degree and the places it could take me but life has a habit of getting in the way and putting unexpected obstacles in front of you.

When I last wrote for the French At Stirling blog, I had just got a Master’s in Translation from Heriot-Watt University. I was maybe naïve but I thought it would be relatively easy to get a job but for whatever reason it didn’t work out that way. It can be tough when you keep getting knocked back to stay positive especially in the age of social media when you can receive almost daily updates on how well friends and former classmates are doing for themselves. I was never the most optimistic guy at the best of times!

As time wore on, I eventually found success. Out of desperation I had applied for two translation jobs at the same time and got interviews for both. One based in Scotland, one based in Spain. I nailed both interviews too. The Spanish one was done over Skype and conducted in 3 languages. I was quite proud to come through that in one piece. I was eventually offered both jobs. Decision time! Guess which one I took…

2020 Mar Stewart H Bute Palm Trees
Bute Palm Trees

Scotland won the day. If you read my last blog you probably understand why. Although I study languages and like to travel, I’m very much a fan of home comforts. I come from an island which a lot of people my age refer to as “The Rock”. It has a declining and ageing population. Most young people leave when they go to university or to find a job on the mainland and don’t return. There are still times when I can’t wait to leave yet when I am away, I can’t wait to come back. It must be an islander thing!

Anyway, I was now working as an in-house translator. I gained experience translating medical and legal documents and met some new people but after some time, I started to realise it just wasn’t for me. I found myself staring at a computer screen all day and was living on my own. Life’s too short to be stuck doing something you don’t enjoy.

2020 Mar Stewart H Do sth different

After I left that job, I moved back home to mull over my next move. It was April 2018 and the FIFA World Cup was just around the corner. I’ve always been a massive football fan and I got the opportunity to combine two passions of mine in football and languages. I worked as a remote translator, proofreader and subtitler. I was able to watch all the games and then translate interviews with players and coaches all from the comfort of my own home. This was the dream but there are only so many World Cups! I liked the flexibility of being freelance and being back home, but I also found myself wanting to get out more and meet new people.

After a few months, I decided to apply for a PGDE in Secondary Education at the University of Glasgow. I was going to become a teacher. It wasn’t a spur of the moment decision. My dad had been a Geography teacher years ago and I was struck by how many of his former pupils had got in touch when he passed away showing just how big an impact he’d had on their lives. I’ve also always felt at home when studying for some reason. It gave me a purpose knowing I had some test or exam to pass or a deadline to make. I feel in retrospect I missed that drive when I left university.

The course at Glasgow gave me a good grounding in what it takes to become a teacher. I did 3 placements throughout the year giving me a taster of what to expect when in front of the class but nothing can truly prepare you! Luckily my decision to choose Argyll & Bute paid off and I am now teaching French and Spanish in the same school where I first learned languages as a pupil all those years ago. It has been a steep learning curve and there is never a dull day, but I wouldn’t change it for anything. Will I still be teaching in 5, 10, 30 years’ time? Who knows! Life has a habit of getting in the way, but I will give it my best shot while I am still doing it.

I know I wouldn’t be in this position were it not for my time at Stirling. I still keep in touch and meet up with some of my old classmates who are all doing different and exciting things with their own lives. I would advise any current students or recent graduates who are looking to make that next step and find a job to stay patient. You might get knocked back a few times but your time will come!’

Many thanks indeed to Stewart for sending through this great update! We’re really pleased to hear that things are going well with the language teaching and look forward to future blog posts.

Congratulations!

It’s graduation week at Stirling and, from all of French at Stirling, hearty congratulations and good wishes to all our students! More to follow soon but, for just now, congratulations and we wish all of you all the very best for the future.

And a special mention to today’s honorary graduate, Lilian Thuram, who was recognised for his contribution to football and for his commitment to education against racism.

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[With thanks to Elaine Livingstone for the photo!]

A Year in Geneva: Translation, Football and Alpine Road Trips

As regular followers of the blog will know, most French at Stirling students will either spend a year working as an English Language Assistantship at some point over their degree (usually between Year 2 and 3, sometimes immediately after graduation) or a semester on Study Abroad at one of our range of partners across the French-speaking world. Every now and then, though, we have a student who manages to spend a full year on Study Abroad and that’s the situation Tom finds himself in at the moment, in the 3rd year of his BA Hons in French and Spanish:

2019 Lock Geneva Photo 3 Mar19‘This year I have had the opportunity to study French and Spanish in the Translation and Interpretation Faculty at the University of Geneva. Having recently completed a year of teaching in Colombia with the British Council, I headed to Switzerland back in the hot seat as a student again.

Having never previously visited, my initial thoughts of Geneva were a pleasant surprise – everything worked, things ran on time and the locals were kind, welcoming and accepting of my rusty French. I had a week to settle in before university started, giving me time to explore the city and the surrounding areas, as well as to find a regular game of football. After a few meet ups with ESN I met some great people from all over and I went from there.

2019 Lock Geneva Photo 2 Mar19University life here has been great, learning translation in both Spanish and French has given me great opportunities to test out a potential career path and what’s more is that the other modules on offer at the university also help me further my other interests such as history and reading. The best part, however, are the people you meet at the university and around the city – be they other ERASMUS students or students from other walks of life.

Geneva can be difficult for immersive language learning, as individuals come from a variety of countries to study, live and work there, making English the de facto language at times. Nevertheless, I found a variety of local cafés and bars that provided me with opportunities to improve my French and after a couple of weeks it had improved to the point where I could hold conversations.

2019 Lock Geneva Photo 5 Mar19

Geneva is famous for plenty of things but, after a year in a small Colombian town, the most notable for me is the high cost of living. It can be extortionate at times, but this has just encouraged me to explore a wider variety of places. My friends and I often get buses, cheap flights or rent a minibus to do weekend trips, ticking off places such as Milan, Lake Garda, Interlaken, Bern, Paris, and Berlin. That has been one of the best things about Geneva, its central location in Europe has given me the opportunity to get around everywhere. I can highly recommend taking road trips through the Swiss alpine countryside, you can see the whole landscape and get a real feel for the culture of each place.

2019 Lock Geneva Photo 1 Mar19Living in a different country has its positives and negatives, the comforts of home can be sorely missed, I’ve realised however that being proactive, doing activities and exploring your new home is the best antidote.

Overall, my experience has been a great one and my language skills have improved immeasurably (even if I sometimes forget how to speak English!). Although tough at times, these have been the situations where I’ve learned the most and I consider myself very lucky to have had this opportunity to meet new people, live in a new country and experience a different university.’

Many thanks to Tom for the great blog post and pictures – we’re delighted this year has worked out so well and look forward to welcoming you back to Stirling in the Autumn!